The Best Weight Benches For Your Home Gym

Gym
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The weight bench is the gym’s unsung hero. It’s the perfect platform on which to build full-body strength and upgrade any free-weights workout. So if you’ve been ticking over at home using dumbbells, a bench will help unlock dozens of new full-body exercises, from the customary bench press and chest flye to major bang-for-your-buck lifts like elevated hip thrusts and incline bench rows.

But before breaking out your credit card, there are a few questions you should ask yourself. Should you get a fixed or adjustable bench? Do you need a barbell rack? How much weight does it need to support? How compact does it need to be?  

Our weight bench buyers’ guide will help you answer these questions, and our top picks will point you in the direction of a bench that suits your needs.


How To Choose The Right Weight Bench

Fixed Versus Adjustable Weight Benches

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Some weight benches include a notched mechanism that allows you to set part of the bench to an incline or, in some cases, a decline. A fixed platform, typically set parallel with the floor, is likely to be sturdier and support a much heavier total weight – but an adjustable bench will allow you to perform more moves and more exercise variations.

Does Your Weight Bench Need A Rack?

If you only own dumbbells and don’t plan on expanding your free-weights collection then the answer is no. If you want to work on your bench press with a barbell then you will need a rack. Be wary of cheap or lightweight models. Some racks use little J-shaped hooks which you guide the barbell into when you’ve finished a set: racks that use large hooks made from steel are safer, but better still are racks with tall poles, pegs and a heavy base.

How Strong Does It Need To Be?

Most weight benches tend to support around 150-200kg of total load, which includes the weight of the lifter. Better-quality (and more expensive) models should handle 300kg and above. Work out what your maximum lift is likely to be, plus your own bodyweight, and give yourself plenty of leeway above this. If deviating from our picks below, double-check that the manufacturer’s listed weight includes the lifter.

What Optional Extras Should You Look For?

Some weight benches also feature pads and handles so you can tackle different exercises, like leg curls and extensions. If this is what you’re after, you may be better with a versatile home multi-gym. If your heart is set on a weight bench with a few frills, make sure the configuration and spacing are correct for your size and the space you have.

The Best Weight Benches

Weights

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Technogym Bench

Best weight bench for extras

Specifications

Dimensions: 44.5in x 14.8in x 17.9in / 112.9cm x 37.6cm x 45.5cm
Weight: 217.8lb / 98.8kg
Weight limit: 264.5lb / 120kg

Reasons to buy

+
Compact footprint
+
Robust construction
+
Supplied with a range of workout equipment

Reasons to avoid

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Can’t be adjusted for incline or decline
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Unsuitable for barbell moves

“Bench” is perhaps underselling this functional training kit from Italian fitness company Technogym. A “multi-gym storage solution” is probably more accurate. It contains resistance bands, weighted knuckles, a training mat and 10 high-quality hexagon dumbbells ranging from 2.5-10kg inside its compact footprint. As a consequence, it isn’t cheap, and the bench itself can’t be adjusted for different angles, but it’s a one-stop shop for full-body workouts.


Bench equipment

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DTX Fitness All-In-One Weight Bench

Most versatile home weight bench

Specifications

Dimensions: 46.4in x 48.8in x 37in / 111.8cm x 124cm x 94cm
Weight: 100kg
Weight limit: 110kg

Reasons to buy

+
Low price 
+
Compatible with barbell moves 
+
Suitable for a range of exercises 

Reasons to avoid

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Bar and weights not included
-
Max weight limit is relatively low  
-
No decline option

Not to be outdone by Technogym, DTX has packed in a rack for the barbell press, as well as a preacher curl pad for biceps exercises and attachments for butterflies and leg raises. It’s not the biggest bench, so users over 6ft (1.8m) may struggle to complete all those exercises in comfort, and while the bench has a max user weight of 110kg, the rack can only take a maximum load of 100kg.


gym equipment

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Domyos Corength Folding Incline Decline Abs Weight Training Bench 500

Best weight bench for under £100

Specifications

Dimensions: 44.4in x 13.7in x 19.6in / 113cm x 35cm x 50cm
Weight: 33lb / 15kg
Weight limit: 485lb / 220kg

Reasons to buy

+
Compact and easy to assemble 
+
Lightweight for easy storage 
+
Adjustable for multiple seat angles

Reasons to avoid

-
Stand required for barbell moves
-
No decline option

This economical bench is easily adjusted to a variety of positions so you can perform flat, incline and decline exercises. There are four incline settings on the backrest – 0°, 30°, 45° and 80° – and the seat can be set flat or raised slightly. The bench has an impressive max weight of 220kg, and can be folded quickly into a fairly compact shape that’s just 20cm high for easy storage. The only drawback is a lack of wheels, but at just 15kg it shouldn’t take too much manhandling.


BodyMax Selectabell SB500 Weight Bench

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BodyMax Selectabell SB500 Weight Bench

Most durable weight bench

Specifications

Dimensions: 54.9in x 15.7in x 17.7in / 139.5cm x 40cm x 45cm
Weight: 79.3lb / 36kg
Weight limit: 661lb / 300kg

Reasons to buy

+
Small footprint
+
Robust construction
+
Adjustable backrest 
+
Transport wheels for easy moving

Reasons to avoid

-
No decline option 
-
Expensive, given weights aren’t included

The Selectabell SB500 is another space-saving weight bench that is similar to Technogym’s offering. However, the key ingredients – the weights – are sold separately. You can add a pair of BodyMax v2.0 22.5kg Selectabell 5-in-1 dumbbells for an extra £159 or the 15-in-1 pair for an added £179. These can then be stored within the weight bench, and will give exercisers a number of dumbbell workouts to explore. Technogym’s bench comes with weights but is significantly more expensive, so if you already have dumbbells (and fancy a bench that can store them) the SB500 becomes an affordable option. Plus, its seat is adjustable for exercises requiring an incline, and transport wheels make it easier to manoeuvre around your home gym. 


Viavito Studio Pro 2000 Olympic Barbell Weight Bench

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Viavito Studio Pro 2000 Olympic Barbell Weight Bench

Best for variety of training angles

Specifications

Dimensions: 61in x 72in x 47.2in / 155cm x 183cm x 120cm
Weight: 132lb / 60kg
Weight limit: 597.4lb / 271kg

Reasons to buy

+
Robust construction
+
Adjustable for multiple seat angles 
+
Compatible for bench press and squats
+
Good value with price reduction

Reasons to avoid

-
No weights included

The Pro 2000 is purpose-built for heavy lifting. Its backrest can be set up in five positions, from incline to decline, allowing the exerciser to attack their pectorals from a variety of angles under the bench press or when using dumbbells for flyes or pull-overs. Eight sets of secure J-shaped hooks running the length of the rack provide further options when pressing a barbell, and the reverse of the bench can be set up for squats, with four height options to position the safety bar in the rack – so you can go as low as you dare. 


BodyMax BE235 Commercial Adjustable Bench

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BodyMax BE235 Commercial Adjustable Bench

Best for gym-like experience

Specifications

Dimensions: 48.8in x 25.5in x 20.4in / 124cm x 65cm x 52cm
Weight: 57.3lb / 26kg
Weight limit: 661lb / 300kg

Reasons to buy

+
Robust construction
+
High max user weight  
+
Rear wheels make moving it easier 

Reasons to avoid

-
Expensive despite big price reduction

The BE235 is a dependable, fully adjustable bench fit that would grace the weights room of any commercial gym. The backrest can be set at multiple angles, from virtually bolt upright to a 45˚ decline, with the seat also adjustable for improved comfort and body alignment. A robust tubular steel frame ensures it is compatible for use in the power rack or with a barbell stand, while rear transport wheels mean you won’t expend too much energy moving it into position. 

Sam Rider
Contributor

Sam Rider is an experienced freelance journalist, specialising in health, fitness and wellness. For over a decade he's reported on Olympic Games, CrossFit Games and World Cups, and quizzed luminaries of elite sport, nutrition and strength and conditioning. Sam is also a REPS level 3 qualified personal trainer, online coach and founder of Your Daily Fix. Sam is also Coach’s designated reviewer of massage guns and fitness mirrors.